you have practiced enough to gain a reward from this dummy

you have practiced enough to gain a reward from this dummy

You have practiced enough to gain a reward from this dummy

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Students can gain valuable experience by working on the campus radio or magazine. V n

While it has lost its tranquility, the area has gained in liveliness. V in n

The company didn't disclose how much it expects to gain from the two deals. V n from/by n/-ing

There is absolutely nothing to be gained by feeling bitter. V n from/by n/-ing

It is sad that a major company should try to gain from other people's suffering. V from n

She gained some 25lb in weight during her pregnancy. V amount

Gain is also a noun., n-var usu with supp (=increase)

Excessive weight gain doesn't do you any good.

They realise that passing exams is no longer enough to gain a place at university. V n

&#&830; for gain phrase PHR after v (disapproval) . buying art solely for financial gain.

The Christian right has been steadily gaining ground in state politics.

&#&830; gain time phrase V inflects, oft PHR to-inf

I hoped to gain time by keeping him talking. gain on phrasal verb If you gain on someone or something that is moving in front of you, you gradually get closer to them.

The Mercedes began to gain on the van. V P n

  • no pain, no gain exp. expression used to point out that one has to struggle or suffer to achieve his goal
  • kleptocrat n. a person paid by the state to work in the interests of the nation who considers it to be a ‘right’ to be able abuse his or her authority to ensure personal gain for himself or herself at the expense of the nation…
  • honey trap n. tempting someone with promise of reward (an attractive person in general) to reveal information or to test one's partner loyalty, faithfulness : can be for lovers, business partners, espionage
  • Cyberextortion n. Cyberextortion is online crime threatening to attack a person coupled with demand of illegal gains to stop the attack

Welcome to English-Cobuild Collins dictionary. Type the word that you look for in the search box above. The results will include words and phrases from the general dictionary as well as entries from the collaborative one.

Corbett is the creator of Expert Enough, and CEO of Fizzle Co. He has always considered being called a “jack of all trades” a compliment. Follow him on Twitter.

Corbett Barr in Becoming an Expert | February 6, 2012

Deliberate Practice: What It Is and Why You Need It

To learn any new skill or gain expertise you need to practice, practice, practice. There isn’t much debate about that.

But here’s what you might not know: scientific research shows that the quality of your practice is just as important as the quantity.

And, more interestingly, these scientists also believe that expert-level performance is primarily the result of expert-level practice NOT due to innate talent.

This concept is known as deliberate practice, and it’s incredibly powerful.

First, let’s look at what the experts have to say. This is from K. Anders Ericsson, a psychologist and scientific researcher out of Florida State University in the paper titled The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance:

People believe that because expert performance is qualitatively different from normal performance the expert performer must be endowed with characteristics qualitatively different from those of normal adults. This view has discouraged scientists from systematically examining expert performers and accounting for their performance in terms of the laws and principles of general psychology.

The common view held until recently was that expert-level performance was simply the result of talent and “natural abilities.” This view has held back scientific progress towards learning what really makes experts so talented, from a psychological perspective.

Think about your own views for a moment.

How often do you say “wow, that guy is talented” when thinking about your favorite athlete, performer or other expert-level role models?

Have you ever thought you’re not cut out to do something due to a lack of talent?

Now here’s where it gets interesting. Back to the findings from Ericsson and his team at Florida State University:

We agree that expert performance is qualitatively different from normal performance and even that expert performers have characteristics and abilities that are qualitatively different from or at least outside the range of those of normal adults. However, we deny that these differences are immutable, that is, due to innate talent. Only a few exceptions, most notably height, are genetically prescribed. Instead, we argue that the differences between expert performers and normal adults reflect a life-long period of deliberate effort to improve performance in a specific domain.

Experts then, aren’t people with freakish natural abilities in a particular domain. Experts are experts at maintaining high-levels of practice and improving performance.

In other words, it’s not about what you’re born with. It’s about how consistently and deliberately you can work to improve your performance.

The importance of a few obvious genetic differences like height can’t be denied within some areas of expertise (basketball or horse jockeying, for example), but in most other areas motivation and deliberate practice can overcome even differences in cognative abilities (brain power).

Introducing Deliberate Practice

Deliberate practice is a highly structured activity engaged in with the specific goal of improving performance.

Deliberate practice is different from work, play and simple repetition of a task. It requires effort, it has no monetary reward, and it is not inherently enjoyable.

When you engage in deliberate practice, improving your performance over time is your goal and motivation.

That’s not to say that deliberate practice can’t be designed to be fun, but it isn’t inherently enjoyable on it’s own.

If you want to gain skills rapidly or approach expert-level status at something, you must understand the importance of deliberate practice and learn how to incorporate it into your daily life.

The Four Essential Components of Deliberate Practice

Research into the history of education (dating back several thousand years), combined with more recent scientific experiments have uncovered a number of conditions for optimal learning and improvement. Again, from K. Anders Ericsson, here are the four essential components of deliberate practice.

When these conditions are met, practice improves accuracy and speed of performance on cognitive, perceptual, and motor tasks:

You must be motivated to attend to the task and exert effort to improve your performance.

The design of the task should take into account your pre-existing knowledge so that the task can be correctly understood after a brief period of instruction.

You should receive immediate informative feedback and knowledge of results of your performance.

You should repeatedly perform the same or similar tasks.

It’s important to note that without adequate feedback about your performance during practice, efficient learning is impossible and improvement is minimal.

Simple practice isn’t enough to rapidly gain skills.

Mere repetition of an activity won’t lead to improved performance.

Your practice must be: intentional, aimed at improving performance, designed for your current skill level, combined with immediate feedback and repetitious.

What Deliberate Practice Means for You

Natural ability is no excuse.

If you’re 5’5″, maybe you shouldn’t set your sites on becoming an NBA center. Some physical limits are obvious. Most other “limits” are cop-outs or relics of old misunderstandings about talent.

What’s cool is that even limits of brainpower can be overcome with deliberate practice. One-on-one tutoring has shown to greatly reduce the differences in achievement between students of different cognitive abilities.

To benefit from practice and reach your potential, you have to constantly challenge yourself.

This doesn’t mean repeatedly doing what you already know how to do.

This means understanding your weaknesses and inventing specific tasks in your practice to address those deficiencies.

How long you persevere determines your limits.

Becoming an expert is a marathon, not a sprint.

You cannot reach your mental and physical limits in just a few weeks or months. To grow to the top of your game, you’ll have to persevere for years.

Your practice has to be deliberate and intense, but it also has to be carefully scheduled and limited in ways to avoid burnout and long-term fatigue (both mental and physical).

Motivation becomes the real constraint on expertise.

Practice isn’t always fun. It’s an investment into improving yourself, your skills and your future.

In order to practice with intention for long enough to become an expert or gain useful skills, you have to find the motivation to make the investment.

Where will you find that motivation?

What is your experience with deliberate practice? How do you stay motivated to purposefully practice something to improve your performance?

Tell us in the comments.

Several books have been written recently based on the underlying study I referred to in this post. Check out these excellent reads to start with:

Outliers: The Story of Success

120 Days to TOPIK #10 – Reduce, Reuse, and Reward your way to Fluency

The 3R’s (and icons) of maintaining a healthy environment and planet can be re-purposed to also remind us how to maintain a healthy, active, and rapidly learning brain.

Reduction is synonymous with simplification. Remember we talked earlier about how “studying harder” is less effective than “lazy recall”? Reducing the amount of work you require yourself to do in order to maximize your learning effectiveness is imperative. Tim Ferriss calls this the “Minimum Effective Dose (MED).” Michael Hyatt quotes him at this post saying, “Anything beyond the MED is wasteful.”

  • What 20% of material can you study to produce 80% of your results?
  • What 20% of work can you do to gain 80% memory retention?
  • Ask yourself: “What’s my Minimum Effective Dose for learning Korean?”

Here are two examples from me:

I LOVE one-sheet cheatsheets because they contain a wealth of information in a very brief, easy to read guide. Therefore, I’ve created two of them for myself already and have a number more in development (as a side note, I’ve already created numerous cheatsheets for computer programming – so I know the kinds of things that I like to use and are effective for me).

The only drawback is that you have to LEARN the words on the cheatsheet FIRST and then use it primarily as a review sheet (though there is enough space to write all the definitions above each word if you choose to do so).

When I started making flashcards this week, I used to WRITE OUT every example sentence for each word (there were two) and then spend more minutes browsing through Google Images to find the “perfect image.” It was totally “wasteful” because I spent about 5-7 minutes per word (30 per day) and I didn’t learn them any better than when I just READ the example sentences.

Now I can spend 2-3 minutes per word (or less) and make 30 flashcards in just about an hour (rather than 3+). I’ve just saved myself 2 FULL HOURS of time!

Another thing I noticed was that ONE daily review of my vocabulary words was effective ENOUGH to warrant NOT reviewing more than once per day.

  • If I review only once, I can recall 50-70% of the new vocabulary (even from yesterday).
  • If I review 2-3 times per day, I still struggle with the same words and can MAYBE recall an extra 2-3 words, but that minimal increase is not significant enough to spend an extra 20-30 minutes per day reviewing multiple times.

For me, the MED is ONCE per day (in the morning when my brain is fresh).

Beyond merely recalling and reviewing words, we must also REUSE words in a meaningful and practical way in order to get them to really “stick.” There are THREE ways to do this:

  1. Listening to the word being used in a sentence
  2. Reading the word in context
  3. REUSING the word in a sentence of your own creation
  1. For Listening, this is a good place to get either a tutor, language exchange partner, join a class, or get a book with an audio CD – or find listening online (remember, Rhinospike is a good resource – and we may eventually try to get our Beginner sentences recorded)
  2. For Reading, get a good book with example sentences for each word, get your tutor to write out examples for you, or do some extensive reading in children’s books or online news.
  3. For Reusing, try to write out AT LEAST 10 sentences for every grammar point (as I previously was doing) in past/present/perfect tenses. This really helped me internalize and learn the grammar more quickly than just doing the workbook exercises.

But again, FOCUS on finding the right Minimum Effective Dose for all of this to minimize your energy expenditure and maximize your results.

On this blog, I’ve previously written extensively on the power of habits. One of the key takeaways from all my study on habits is that:

This explains why something like quitting smoking or going on a diet is so hard. Your body already receives a physiological and psychological reward from either smoking or overeating, so trying to cut back (reducing your reward) is very difficult.

If you can instead replace a bad habit with a good one (that rewards you in an equal or better way), then maintaining the new habit is much more effective.

For learning Korean, consider these (rewarding) suggestions:

  1. ONLY ever drink your favorite coffee when you’re studying Korean
  2. ONLY go to your favorite coffee shop with your language exchange partner
  3. Eat your favorite snack immediately AFTER a successful study session
  4. Don’t eat lunch every day until you’ve accomplished a certain task (lunch is your reward)
  5. Limit yourself to terrible tasting Korean alcohol on your own, but reward yourself with your favorite drinks when out with (Korean) friends and chatting (in Korean)

I’m sure there are other things you can think of, but this will give you a good starting point.

  1. Reduce: Spend some time, determine, and WRITE OUT your Minimum Effective Dose (MED) of Korean (20% effort that produces 80% of your desired results) – then commit to your MED every day (it’s a minimum so should be easy, right?)
  2. Reuse: For every new vocabulary word you create a flashcard for, find at least ONE way to reuse it – ask for an example sentence from your tutor, read an example sentence, or write your own example sentences
  3. Reward: Set yourself up for success with Habits by determining ONE great thing you LOVE that you’ll only reward yourself with AFTER (or while) studying Korean

Have you had any success previously with any of these suggestions? What new information sparks a lightbulb in your brain to help you study Korean better? Let me know in the Comments below or on social media with #120TOPIK.

You have practiced enough to gain a reward from this dummy

"Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of others to be seen by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven.

"Watch out! Don't do your good deeds publicly, to be admired by others, for you will lose the reward from your Father in heaven.

“Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven.

Be careful not to perform your righteous acts before men to be seen by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven.

And beware not to do your righteousness before men in order to be seen by them. Otherwise you have no reward in the presence of your Father in the heavens.

"Beware of practicing your righteousness before men to be noticed by them; otherwise you have no reward with your Father who is in heaven.

Take heed that ye do not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise ye have no reward of your Father which is in heaven.

"Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of others to be seen by them. Otherwise, you have no reward with your Father in heaven.

When you do good deeds, don't try to show off. If you do, you won't get a reward from your Father in heaven.

"Make certain you do not perform your religious duties in public so that people will see what you do. If you do these things publicly, you will not have any reward from your Father in heaven.

"Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of people, to be seen by them. Otherwise, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven.

"Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of people in order to be noticed by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven.

"Be careful not to display your righteousness merely to be seen by people. Otherwise you have no reward with your Father in heaven.

"Be careful that you do not do your righteousness before people, to be seen by them, or else you have no reward from your Father who is in heaven.

Pay attention in your charity giving, that you do it not in front of people so that you may be seen by them, otherwise there is no reward for you with your Father in Heaven.

"Be careful not to do your good works in public in order to attract attention. If you do, your Father in heaven will not reward you.

“Beware of practicing your righteousness before men to be noticed by them; otherwise you have no reward with your Father who is in heaven.

Take heed not to do your alms before men, to be seen of them; otherwise, ye have no reward of your Father who is in the heavens.

Take heed that you give not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise you have no reward of your Father who is in heaven.

Take heed that you do not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise you have no reward of your Father which is in heaven.

Take heed that ye do not your righteousness before men, to be seen of them: else ye have no reward with your Father who is in heaven.

TAKE heed that you do not your justice before men, to be seen by them: otherwise you shall not have a reward of your Father who is in heaven.

Take heed not to do your alms before men to be seen of them, otherwise ye have no reward with your Father who is in the heavens.

Take heed that ye do not your righteousness before men, to be seen of them: else ye have no reward with your Father which is in heaven.

Take heed that ye do not your alms before men, to be seen by them: otherwise ye have no reward from your Father who is in heaven.

"But beware of doing your good actions in the sight of men, in order to attract their gaze; if you do, there is no reward for you with your Father who is in Heaven.

"Be careful that you don't do your charitable giving before men, to be seen by them, or else you have no reward from your Father who is in heaven.

Take heed your kindness not to do before men, to be seen by them, and if not -- reward ye have not from your Father who is in the heavens;

1 Be careful not to perform your righteous acts before men to be seen by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven. 2 So when you give to the needy, do not sound a trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and on the streets, to be praised by men. Truly I tell you, they already have their reward.…

And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites. For they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by men. Truly I tell you, they already have their reward.

When you fast, do not be somber like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces to show men they are fasting. Truly I tell you, they already have their reward.

All their deeds are done for men to see. They broaden their phylacteries and lengthen their tassels.

When Peter saw this, he addressed the people: "Men of Israel, why are you surprised by this? Why do you stare at us as if by our own power or godliness we had made this man walk?

Take heed that you do not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise you have no reward of your Father which is in heaven.

alms. or, righteousness.

of your. or, with your.

(1) From the protest against the casuistry which tampered with and distorted the great primary commandments, the Sermon on the Mount passes to the defects of character and action which vitiated the religion of Pharisaism even where it was at its best. Its excellence had been that it laid stress, as the religion of Islam did afterwards, on the three great duties of the religious life, almsgiving, fasting, and prayer, rather than on sacrifices and offerings. Verbally, Pharisaism accepted on this point the widest and most spiritual teaching of the prophets, and so its home was in the Synagogue rather than the Temple, and it gained a hold on the minds of the people which the priests never gained. But a subtle evil found its way even here. Love of praise and power, rather than spontaneous love, and self-denial, and adoration, was the mainspring of their action, and so that which is the essence of all religion was absent even from the acts in which the purest and highest form of religion naturally shows itself.

Your alms. --The better MSS. give righteousness, and obviously with a far truer meaning, as the wider word which branches off afterwards into the three heads of alms, fasting, prayer. In Rabbinic language the whole was often used for the part, and "righteousness" was identified with "mercifulness," and that with giving money. The Greek version of the LXX. often renders the Hebrew word for righteousness by "alms." In the New Testament, however, there is no such narrowing of its meaning, and here the full significance of the word is fixed by its use in Matthew 5:20. The reading "alms" probably arose from a misconception of the real meaning of the passage, and the consequent assumption that it simply introduced the rule given in Matthew 6:2-3.

To be seen of them. --It is the motive, and not the fact of publicity, that vitiates the action. The high ideal of the disciple of Christ is to let his light shine "before men" (the self-same words are used in Matthew 5:16 as here), and yet to be indifferent to their praise or even their opinion. In most religious men there is probably a mingling of the two motives, and we dare not say at what precise stage the presence of the lower overpowers the higher. It is enough to remember that it is the little speck which may taint the whole character till it loses all its life.

Of your Father which is in heaven. --More accurately, with your Father, as meaning, "in His estimate." The act is not done to and for Him, and therefore (speaking after the manner of men) He looks on it as having no claim to payment.

This solo quest has you train 3 of the service staff that live in Eye of the North so they can help fight while the Ebon Vanguard is away.

  • Tell Artificer Mullenix when you are ready to start the training session.
  • Help train the service staff by leading them into combat. Destroy 20 practice dummies in 3 minutes.
  • See Artificer Mullenix for your reward.

When you start the quest, you are brought to an instance of the Eye of the North outpost along with the three service staff. After the twenty training dummies pop up, you must help the NPCs destroy them. The NPCs will attack the closest dummy and continue around the circle until all twenty are destroyed. The dummies don't attack or use skills, so healing skills and interrupts are not needed.

As the dummies leave exploitable corpses, a minion master with a damage skill and Great Dwarf Weapon works exceptionally well.

To complete the quest as quickly as possible, resign when you first arrive at the site, before the timer begins. Type the /resign command before entering the mission, and simply hit enter as soon as possible after the loading screen disappears. The log will say you have failed, but it will also say you killed all twenty dummies. In about five seconds, you will be returned to the Eye of the North, and you can claim your reward.

Even if you miss this opportunity, the quest itself should be easy.

"That near disaster with the Charr expeditionary force has me especially concerned about our ability to defend the Eye of the North. Between the Charr, the Centaur tribes, and the occasional drunken Norn we've a lot to be concerned about. I want to make sure those who remain to provide support services are trained for battle. Show those dummies who's boss."  Accept: "Rune traders with swords? This should be good."  Decline: "I don't do miracles."  Ask: "You will be separated from your party and loaded into your own instance to train the Eye of the North service and support staff. Are you ready?" I am ready. I am not ready.

"Let's hope your training paid off. I've got reports of enemies on the march toward us at this very moment."

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