what is the theme of the count of monte cristo

what is the theme of the count of monte cristo

"The Count Of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas. What are the lines which you thought were significant to the ongoing theme of "The Count of Monte Cristo?" Why did you think that?

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Essay on Count of Monte Cristo Annalysis

. Samuel Welsh Mrs. Stubbs Honors English, 501D 11 August, 2013 “The Count of Monte Cristo” analysis and thoughts This summer, I had the pleasure of reading a 1,300-paged behemoth of a book. “The Count of Monte Cristo” is a novel placed in an early to mid nineteenth century France, and was originally written in French. It was first printed as an eighteen volume serialized novel, printed from august of 1844 to January of 1846, but complete versions of the novel were printed all throughout the 1900’s. The novel focuses on the story of Edmond Dantes (a.k.a. the Count of Monte Cristo) and his endeavors to enact his revenge on those who have done him wrong. I was first doubting my decision in picking this story, but by only the fourth chapter, my head was racing with thoughts and questions not only about the characters or the upcoming chapters, but also about life and human nature as a whole. This fourth chapter was the first instance in the novel of acts of selfishness and betrayal. Edmond Dantes is a successful young merchant sailor whose life has taken a turn for the better. He has been chosen to succeed his ship’s captain and will soon marry his love, Mercedes. But soon, just as easily as life has improved, it will take a dramatic downward plummet. This happens when Fernand, Mercedes’ other lover.

Dumas' the Count of Monte Cristo Essay

. Historical analysis of Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo Alexander Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo is founded upon historical events and political intrigue. He not only uses historical facts to help the reader understand, he also weaves such details into the story to make it possible for his reader to have an understanding of the current events that were taking place in France, during that time (from approx. 1815 through 1838). Dumas would want his readers to be familiar with French history, and to have it in their mind as they read his beloved tale. In the 1800’s Marseilles was one of the largest ports in the south of France with a “population between 93,000 and 110,000”, thus trade flourished and it was home to many merchants, and businesses (Marseilles). This is where our story of revenge begins. Marseilles was the hometown of Edmond who we meet as a naïve sailor who is later to become imprisoned as a political criminal, and altered for life. Marseilles was also the home to both Edmond’s father who dies of hunger soon after his son was imprisoned, and Edmonds beautiful, and noble fiancé Mercedes who was a poor, Catalan. After Dantes’ imprisonment Mercedes cared for his father until he passed. She lost faith of Dantes ever being released from prison and back by her side, there for she felt she had no choice but to marry Fernand.

The Count of Monte Cristo Essay

. The Count of Monte Cristo The Count of Monte Cristo, written by Alexander Dumas, is a classic novel about a young sailor named Edmond Dantes who is imprisoned for alleged conspiracy with Napoleon. Doomed to a life in jail, Dantes discovers that the series of disastrous events that led to his imprisonment were caused by his very own “friends”. Vowing to get his revenge, Dantes manages to escape captivity, and find those who made his life miserable. Dantes then identifies himself as the Count of Monte Cristo in order to execute his carefully wrought revenge to bring down each and every one of his avengers. Although there are several themes throughout this novel, the one most prevalent is the perseverance required to get what one wants. Dantes starts to show perseverance the moment he escapes from the Chateau d’ If in his determination to get revenge on those who caused his imprisonment. In his new life as the Count of Monte Cristo, Dantes kindles new relationships with his former acquaintances in attempt to turn them on each other from within. Initially Monte Cristo appears to be completely heartless; however, he does find ways to benefit his new friends as well as get his revenge. Monte Cristo’s first target.

The Count of Monte Cristo Essay

. The Count of Monte Cristo By: Alexandre Dumas Type of Literary Work: Historical Novel This book is an example of a historical Novel. It is historically accurate, and consists of characters that could have existed in the nineteenth century. Theme:Judgment Day comes to us all inevitably. We all pay for all evil and injustices of our life, yet sometimes there will be someone so viciously wronged, that he will return like a wrath of nature, with and unquenchable thirst for vengeance. Such a vendetta is the building block for the theme of this novel. The Count of Monte Cristo is that wrath of vengeance that crushes those who plotted his demise. Fernand Mondego and Danglars both wronged Dantes, and both were motivated by envy. Both men were filled with jealousy and never thought of the consequences of their actions. Villefort disposes of Dantes because of ambition. He would stop at nothing to climb the aristocratic ladder. Finally, Caderousse, a man that is simply ill natured, helped in the destruction of Dantes> None of these men could fathom how costly the price of these injustices would be. The actions and painful consequences exemplify the novel's theme. Injustice toward the innocent for ignoble motives such as envy and jealousy will eventually be avenged severely. Live a life of.

The Count of Monte Cristo Analysis Essay

. Glenn Boswell January 19, 2014 English 2 Pages in Book: 531 The Count of Monte Cristo Introduction The Count of Monte Cristo was written by Alexandre Dumas. It was first published in 1844. More recently, it was published by Bantam Dell in 1956 in New York, New York. The book I read was translated by Lowell Bair. The story takes place in the 1800s in France, Italy and on the Island of Monte Cristo. The setting is during the period in France when Napoleon Bonaparte returns to power after being exiled to the Island of Elba, called the Hundred Days, and after, when King Louis XVIII returns to power for the second time. At that point, Napoleon is exiled to the island of Saint Helena. Major Characters (Note: There is not much physical description of the characters in the book). The protagonist of the story is Edmond Dantes. Dantes takes on many aliases throughout the book, including: Count of Monte Cristo, Sinbad the Sailor, Abbe Busoni, Lord Wilmore, and a chief banking clerk at Thomson and French. When the story begins, Dantes is a young sailor who sales for Pierre Morrel on the ship called the Pharoan. He is liked by everybody, and is a well respected sailor, and intends to marry a beautiful girl named Mercedes. Later in the book, after he is betrayed by his friends, he becomes the.

The Count of Monte Cristo Essay

. 2013 The Mad Twins The Count of Monte Cristo, written by Alexandre dumas in 1845, has fascinated and intrigued readers for centuries, with its numerous gothic elements and motifs. It was written in France during the time after Napoleon was dethroned in 1844. Alexandre Dumas took a tour of Southern France in 1834 and much of the information that he gained on the tour was used to write this novel including the City of Marseille. The novel, with its complex and diverse range of characters and their relations, is littered with gothic references, motifs, and symbols. Three particular motifs that Dumas repeatedly used throughout the plot are the Faust, and doppelgangers to show that Dantés believes he is powerful enough to manipulate and control other people, and he Dumas also uses a magic talisman to show the transition Edmond makes from a naïve seaman to a master manipulator. One motif found most often in The Count of Monte Cristo is the Faust. After Dantés escapes prison he truly believes that he is capable of anything and that no one can stop him. Renée Winegarten says that “The Count of Monte Cristo, himself, has a fabulous inexhaustible amount of wealth and the immense power it gives him,” (Winegarten 13). Edmond Dantés manipulates people’s destinies almost as if.

The Count of Monte Cristo: Revenge Essay

. The Count of Monte Cristo: Revenge The Story of Edmond Dantès, the Sailor, who Becomes the Rich & Powerful Count of Monte Cristo and Takes Revenge on all his Enemies. Chesky Hoffman June 17, 1996 Dr. Goodale In this essay I will show how Edmond Dantes punishes his four enemies with relation to their specific ambitions. Edmond is sent to jail due to his enemies' jealousy. After he escapes he becomes rich and powerful and gets back at them. Before I relate to you how Dantes gets back at his enemies I would like to familiarize you with the story. The story describes the life of its main character Edmond Dantes. He is promoted to captain of his ship. This promotion ignites the jealousy of his fellow shipmate Danglars. Dantes is then falsely accused of being a Bonapartist. This means he sides with Napoleon Bonaparte and is committing treason against his own king. He is sent to a prison called the Château d'If. The Château d'If was surrounded by water and was known as a place of no return. When Dantes escapes, he takes revenge against his four enemies who conspired against him to send him to prison, in the manner of an eye for and eye. These four conspirators are Danglars, Caderousse, Fernand Mondago, and Villefort. In order to take revenge on his four enemies, Dantes uses a variety of names and disguises. The main new identity he uses for.

The count of monte cristo Essay

. II. Plot Synopsis "The Count of Monte Cristo" has a touching story. It is about injustice, love, revenge, friendship, jealousy, justice, selfishness, betrayal, and the power of money. Edmond Dantes (James Caviezel), the second mate of a French trading ship, a young and successful merchant sailor, is planning to marry Mercedes, his lover, after he gets his captain's paper. Mercedes (Dagmara Dominczyk) promises to marry him, for she is in love with him. Fernand Mondego (Guy Pearce), a representative of the ship, Edmond's best friend, is obviously jealous of Edmond Dantes. He could not get Mercedes to love him even though he secretly desires to marry Mercedes. Edmond Dantes did not know that Fernand Mondego desires Mercedes and is jealous of him. As far as Edmond knows, Fernand is his best friend who always goes on adventures with him. When Edmond Dantes, Fernand Mondego, and the crew return from Elba to Marseilles, the troubles begin. Danglars (Albie Woodington), one of the captains of the crew, is mad at Edmond Dantes. Mousier Morell (Patrick Godfrey) displace him by hiding behind his rank; and Mousier Morell promotes Edmond Dantes to be the captain of the ship by trying to save the captain's life. Fernand Mondego becomes more jealous when Fernand Mondego hears the news that Edmond Dantes is now the captain of the ship. With Fernand's jealousy and Danglars' madness of Edmond Dantes, they secretly made a plan.

What are 3 themes of the count of monte cristo and get quotes from the book supporting each?

My asssignment is to write an essay for my 11th-12th grade english class (i'm in 11th) and as far as i know i'm supposed to write about three themes from the count of monte cristo and it is due tomorrow. so this is quite urgent. anyway, to make this easier on the answerer. i have three themes i came up with. i just cant find anything explaining it in the book itself. so here they are:

Revenge, Forgiveness, and Corruption (you can change corruption to get a better one if you choose) all i need are words explaining them and quotes from the book supporting my thesis statement. again, please help me, this is very urgent because this is worth 200 pts. on my grade and is due tomorrow. i cannot afford to fail. help much appreciated. -Zack

GradeSaver is a good place for this. Please see my link below. It will take you right there.

What are the Underlying Themes in The Count of Monte Cristo?

A most intriguing novel by Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo makes the reader confront his or her own challenges. Betrayed by his own friends, arrested at his wedding feast, and charged for treason, for Edmond Dantes, that was only the beginning. During this terrible time, Dantes also loses his father, fiancé, and any hope for a happy life. The disguise of an aristocratic count is the way that Edmond reveals himself to Paris society all in the name of revenge. Throughout this novel, the reader finds himself truly examining his own life. Several meanings surface throughout the twists and turns of this exciting book, including love and betrayal.

"I love Edmond Dantes and no other man will ever be my husband. . As long as I live. . If he dies, so will I. . ." (pg. 10) Funny isn't it, how in love everything suddenly becomes life and death? In the Count of Monte Cristo, Mercedes loved Edmond.

But at the same time, she had to move on when she realized that he wasn't coming back. But when he did, she was definitely still in love with him, but was married to Ferdnand. Even with that in mind, she realizes all that she is missing without Edmond, " There are some predestined lives whose whole future is ruined by an early mistake. When I believed you to be dead, I too should have died. What good idd it do for me to mourn your loss eternally in my heart?. . .I denied my love and, like all renegades, I bring misfortune to everyone around me." (pg. 411) There is a certain point in life when one has to look beyond his emotions and realize that not everything works out like it should. On the flip side.

What are the Underlying Themes in The Count of Monte Cristo?. (2003, October 06). In WriteWork.com. Retrieved 23:59, March 25, 2018, from http://www.writework.com/essay/underlying-themes-count-monte-cristo

WriteWork contributors. "What are the Underlying Themes in The Count of Monte Cristo?" WriteWork.com. WriteWork.com, 06 October, 2003. Web. 25 Mar. 2018.

WriteWork contributors, "What are the Underlying Themes in The Count of Monte Cristo?," WriteWork.com, http://www.writework.com/essay/underlying-themes-count-monte-cristo (accessed March 25, 2018)

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Edmond Dantès takes justice into his own hands because he is dismayed by the limitations of society’s criminal justice system. Societal justice has allowed his enemies to slip through the cracks, going unpunished for the heinous crimes they have committed against him. Moreover, even if his enemies’ crimes were uncovered, Dantès does not believe that their punishment would be true justice. Though his enemies have caused him years of emotional anguish, the most that they themselves would be forced to suffer would be a few seconds of pain, followed by death.

Considering himself an agent of Providence, Dantès aims to carry out divine justice where he feels human justice has failed. He sets out to punish his enemies as he believes they should be punished: by destroying all that is dear to them, just as they have done to him. Yet what Dantès ultimately learns, as he sometimes wreaks havoc in the lives of the innocent as well as the guilty, is that justice carried out by human beings is inherently limited. The limits of such justice lie in the limits of human beings themselves. Lacking God’s omniscience and omnipotence, human beings are simply not capable of—or justified in—carrying out the work of Providence. Dumas’s final message in this epic work of crime and punishment is that human beings must simply resign themselves to allowing God to reward and punish—when and how God sees fit.

Relative Versus Absolute Happiness

A great deal separates the sympathetic from the unsympathetic characters in The Count of Monte Cristo. The trait that is most consistently found among the sympathetic characters and lacking among the unsympathetic is the ability to assess one’s circumstances in such a way as to feel satisfaction and happiness with one’s life. In his parting message to Maximilian, Dantès claims that “[t]here is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more.” In simpler terms, what separates the good from the bad in The Count of Monte Cristo is that the good appreciate the good things they have, however small, while the bad focus on what they lack.

Dantès9rsquo;s enemies betray him out of an envy that arises from just this problem: despite the blessings these men have in their own lives, Dantès9rsquo;s relatively superior position sends them into a rage of dissatisfaction. Caderousse exemplifies this psychological deficiency, finding fault in virtually every positive circumstance that life throws his way. Caderousse could easily be a happy man, as he is healthy, clever, and reasonably well off, yet he is unable to view his circumstances in such a way as to feel happy. At the other end of the spectrum are Julie and Emmanuel Herbaut—they are fully capable of feeling happiness, even in the face of pressing poverty and other hardships. The Dantès of the early chapters, perfectly thrilled with the small happiness that God has granted him, provides another example of the good and easily satisfied man, while the Dantès of later chapters, who has emerged from prison unable to find happiness unless he exacts his complicated revenge, provides an example of the bad and unsatisfiable man.

Dantès declares himself an exile from humanity during the years in which he carries out his elaborate scheme of revenge. He feels cut off not only from all countries, societies, and individuals but also from normal human emotions. Dantès is unable to experience joy, sorrow, or excitement; in fact, the only emotions he is capable of feeling are vengeful hatred and occasional gratitude. It is plausible that Dantès9rsquo;s extreme social isolation and narrow range of feeling are simply the result of his obsession with his role as the agent of Providence. It is not difficult to imagine that a decade-long devotion to a project like Dantès9rsquo;s might take a dramatic toll on one’s psychology.

Yet Dantès9rsquo;s alienation from humanity is not solely due to his obsessive lust for revenge but also to his lack of love for any living person. Though he learns of his enemies’ treachery years before he escapes from prison, his alienation from humanity begins to take hold only when Abbé Faria dies. Until Faria’s death, Dantès9rsquo;s love for Faria keeps him connected to his own humanity, by keeping the humanizing emotion of love alive within him. When Dantès learns that his father is dead and that Mercédès has married another man, his alienation is complete. There are no longer any living people whom he loves, and he loses hold of any humanizing force.

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