amy tan mother

amy tan mother

Amy Tan makes a valid point about the use of different Englishes that are spoken in different places and to certain people. What one says may sometimes vary based on the person, situation, or event as well. How one speaks and what they pick up on happens in the home and other people see them differently based on the way they speak. Different languages become difficult to translate as well because there isn’t always a similar word in the translating language. Many people can relate to this story in the aspect that everyone has their own way of speaking and others’ make them feel inferior with their speech. Some people may have difficulty saying certain words and those who speak well may downsize the verbally handicapped. This is a great essay that relates well to this day and time.

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Essay on Mother Tongue by Amy Tan

. Mother Tongue, by Amy Tan I am not a scholar of English or literature. I cannot give you much more than personal opinions on the English language and its variations in this country or others. I am a writer. And by that definition, I am someone who has always loved language. I am fascinated by language in daily life. I spend a great deal of my time thinking about the power of language -- the way it can evoke an emotion, a visual image, a complex idea, or a simple truth. Language is the tool of my trade. And I use them all -- all the Englishes I grew up with. Recently, I was made keenly aware of the different Englishes I do use. I was giving a talk to a large group of people, the same talk I had already given to half a dozen other groups. The nature of the talk was about my writing, my life, and my book, The Joy Luck Club. The talk was going along well enough, until I remembered one major difference that made the whole talk sound wrong. My mother was in the room. And it was perhaps the first time she had heard me give a lengthy speech, using the kind of English I have never used with her. I was saying things like, "The intersection of memory upon imagination" and "There is an aspect of my fiction that relates to thus-and-thus'--a speech filled with carefully wrought grammatical phrases, burdened, it suddenly seemed to me, with nominalized forms, past perfect tenses, conditional phrases, all.

. strongly written “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan, it shows a great deal of strength from the Asian American culture. Throughout the reading it showed how hard it was and still is for Asian Americans to work through the difficulties of the English language. The essay talked first about the different languages of English that this young lady learned and used through her life. The second part was about the difficulties that she had through school because English wasn’t here strongest subject and lastly the problems that arose for her because of the way her mother spoke English. Having English as a second language for Amy was difficult at times, but through her faults and triumphs she overcame and succeeded when no one thought she could. As Amy began her long journey to become a writer it was easier for her after she realized all the languages she spoke throughout her lifetime. She used many different languages with different people and didn’t even know it. When she spoke to people that spoke English as their primary language she used correct English, in contrast to when she spoke with her mother it was simpler and broken English. It was very hard for her to understand the difference until she asked fellow friends about how her mother spoke. As she began to realize that differences that she had encountered it was becoming easier for her to tell.

Mother Tongue by Amy Tan Essay

. 10 December 2014 Rhetorical Analysis Writer, Amy Tan, in her essay, “Mother Tongue,” explains that different types of English affect someone’s response and attitude. Because Tan wrote this essay about her mother, she mainly describes the responses her mother gets with her broken English. Tan’s purpose is to show how broken English speakers are dissuaded from preferfecting it and how they are looked down up in society. She adopts an informative tone in order to show society how badly broken English speakers are treated. Tan introduces her essay by proposing that different speaking patterns are shown with different people. Her use of inductive reasoning is found through her anecdotes with her mom’s English skills. She uses inductive reasoning in order to show how her mother speaks English, how her husband speaks English, and how she herself, speaks English with her mom and society. Her use of inductive reasoning proves her point that different people use different forms of language. Tan continues her essay by explaining that broken English speakers are looked down upon in society. She helps prove her claim of mistreatment by using enumeratio constantly throughout her essay. She uses enumeratio in order to emphasize the mistreatment her mother .

Mother Tongue by Amy Tan Essay

. Summary In the essay Mother Tongue, Amy Tan talked about her love and fascination of language, and how language can evoke an emotion, a visual image, and how it’s a tool she uses everyday in writing. She then goes into how she is aware of the different ways she uses the English language, she was in a middle of a speech, talking very precise about her book to a group of people using her knowledge of correct grammar that she has learned throughout school, and books, until she spotted her mother, and started to reminisce about how she holds a conversation with her mom. She starts off by giving a example of a conversation with her mom, they were talking about a price of a piece of furniture and Tan heard herself saying, not waste money that way, and she knows this different kind of English , she has been speaking with her mother, family talk ,she calls it, all of her life. Tan also expresses how at the same time her mother is very intelligent. She reads Forbes report, listens to Wall Street Week, and converses daily with her stockbroker. Tan calls this "Broken9quot; or "Fractured9quot; English. Tan goes into a explanation about how she was also ashamed of her mother’s English, because Tan believed that her English reflected the quality of what she had to say. Tan states she thinks family is the major.

Mother Tongue by Amy Tan Essay

. reflection of skill without its own story, as Amy Tan once said "The goal of every serious writer of literature is to try to find your voice and your art because it comes from your own experiences, your own pain." Amy Tan herself writes all of her work with her mother in mind as the reader, her inspiration. She writes to show the beautiful and passionate side of her mother that people can't see. In "Mother Tongue," Amy Tan describes how all of the Englishes that she grew up with, normal English and "mother tongue" English, has shaped her first outlook of life. And through the essay, Tan wants to send a powerful message of how we ought to view people by their beautiful side, but not by their shortcomings. Writing the essay in narration, Amy Tan has depicted very clearly how "mother tongue" or "broken9quot; English affects her as a child using both her excellent diction as well as the broken usage of English. Throughout the essay, she intelligently weaves many humorous stories to lessen the inevitable dullness of telling someone's past. And even though the essay shows many of her mother's limited usage of English, which can lead the audience to misunderstand her mother, Amy Tan never forgets to.

. Oct 3, 2014 Rachelle Worrell In Amy Tans "Mother Tongue" the emphasizes on american english, views on Amy's mothers "Broken English". When speaking from amy's mother tongue she rights using all sorts of different grammatical. When she is addressing an American professional Amy's english is very proper. Amy views her mothers "broken english as normal. Amy knows her mother is not a dumb lady by any means she understands things like the stock market. Amy is frustrate by how society looks down on her mother as if she is not as smart because Her mothers English is "limited9quot; The passage speaks on how the educational system steers Chinese American away from English and has them focus on Math and engineering. 4. Key Word Sentences a. Select 4-5 words you think are most important in the text. "broken9quot; "limited9quot; "simple9quot; "fractured9quot; b. Write these words into a sentence that makes sense. American society viewed Amy tans mothers English as "broken9quot; "limited9quot; "simple9quot; "fractured9quot; c. Repeat this twice more (for a total of e sentences using the words). Evan though Amy's mothers English was viewed as "broken9quot; "limited9quot; "simple9quot; or "fractured9quot;, Amy Tan wrote her books as if her mother.

. Amy Tan, the author of “Mother Tongue,” gives the audience a new outlook and better understanding of the struggles that every immigrant who lives in United States had gone through every day. Amy Tan gives the audience the positive view on the “broken” English speakers by using herself and her mother as an example. Her mother did not get respect from the hospital and also the stockbroker due to her limited use of English. In contrast, Amy Tan was treated very well because of speaking proper English. This shows that there is discrimination between people who speak proper English and people who do not. Further, Amy Tan points out that although her mother speaking is not fluent, her comprehension is really good. The author argues that people should not judge the others (especially immigrants) based on their spoken language successfully because she uses most of rhetorical appeals pathos, ethos, and logos to show that language is not a credible indicator in measuring individual’s competency. The article’s intended audience includes Amy Tan’s mother, immigrants, and fluent English speakers. The author believes that language likes an invisible wall that prevents her mother from getting respect from the others. “The fact that people in department stores, at.

. After reading Amy Tan’s “Mother Tongue”, I realized how many different “Englishes” I have spoken or used, as well as how many I have heard in my life-particularly while in the military. For example, how I speak with authority figures versus friends, and how I speak with my daughter as opposed to “educated” adults. Although the English I speak with friends and coworkers is often filled with slang and swear words, I would never speak like that in many other settings. One of those times is, when spending time with my parents, it is always a “please and thank you” environment. Similarly when I’m with a boss at work or a professor at school I will always try to be as professional as possible, such as using sir or ma’am for example. As well as the English I use speaking with my five year old daughter, I speak softer and use smaller words. However, if I do use larger words, I always make sure to explain the meaning to her. I never miss an opportunity to expand my daughter’s vocabulary. I’ve also had the opportunity while serving in the United States Air Force, to hear many different “Englishes”. Being in the military, you get to work with and spend a lot of time with people from all over America who speak in different dialects related to their social backgrounds. One day you might work with someone from the Deep South and the next day, someone from Maine. Then you might get lucky and work with someone from your own part of the.

Many people can relate to this story in the aspect that everyone has their own way of speaking and others’ make hem feel Inferior with their speech. Some people may have difficulty saying certain words and those who speak well may downsize the verbally handicapped. This is a great essay that relates well to this day and time. Tan relates to her own experiences to compare how people think and to how society sees them. She believed her mother to be illiterate because she spoke improper or broken English and other people looked down on her for it.

She was laughed at and often times not taken seriously because, being an immigrant with a strong Asian aground, her English wasn’t as proper as others. Amy Tan grew up taking calls for her mother and Impersonating her on the phone so her mother did not sound so illiterate while trying to communicate with superiors or people who owed her money. This strategy was soon found out however, when Mrs.. Tan had to speak to these people In person. Amy believed, “her [mother’s] English reflected the quality of what she had to say. That is, because she expressed them imperfectly her thoughts were imperfect…

Need essay sample on Amy Tan – Mother Tongue

People in department stores, at banks, and at restaurants did not take err seriously. Did not give her good service, pretend not to understand her, or even acted as if they did not hear her. ” (142) Society has the need to be perfect and if someone speaks imperfectly, then they are often treated unfairly. Languages spoken in the home and often picked up at school threw peers. The house is the base for learning. Amy Tan came from an immigrant family where no one knew how to speak proper English. This In turn, made it hard to learn the correct way of speaking especially when learning.

The first step of speaking the proper way is o recognize how everyone else speaks as well as the way they react to what is said to them. Once someone recognizes that there Is a difference In the way they speak, in comparison to the rest of society, and how they are treated, they become aware of how they can change their English. They must first start by paying attention to people around them; how they act and react to the way things are said to them. Different English vary based on environments’. When someone is at work. Hey have a particular way In which they talk to different people; consumers, superiors, ND fellow co-workers. While changing to a different situation; at home, one would probably not talk to their parents the same way that they would ague with a sibling. Speaking to teachers would also differ from being with friends or speaking with strangers. English vary based on group or environment because the people who are being spoken to need to be able to fully understand what is spoken. Amy and her mother experienced this as well. She states, “Some of my friends tell me they understand 50 percent of what my mother says.

Some say they understand 80 to 90 recent. Some say they understand none of it, as if she were speaking Chinese. But to me, my mother’s English is perfectly clear, perfectly natural. It’s my mother’s tongue. ” (141) Growing up with her mother, Amy became accustomed to the way her mother spoke, everyone interprets a languages differently based on their own perspective. Amy Tan believes that with growing up in an immigrant household and her mother being her role model, speaking broken English in the home negatively impacted her academically. L think my mother’s English almost had an effect on imitating my possibilities in life as well. I do think that the language spoken in the family plays a large role in shaping the language of the child” (143) Tan claims that her I. Q. And S. A. T scores where hindered by improper English in the household. What Amy states makes sense in the aspect that everyone learns to speak the language they where raised with. Peers influence your speech, but your home life defines it. When you hear a language all your life, it becomes the way you speak as well.

When one grows up with a language, they don’t think to question it. Need of improvement does not even become an idea until you connect that the way you speak reflects the way you speak to a point. The use of different English is so natural that few people are aware of any change in our language, but it has become so natural for people to alter their speech in a way that is comfortable for everyone and so that it can be better understood. Our vocabulary and ideas change to better suit any given environment and differs for all groups of people as well; peers, family, superiors, and clients.

The environment en grows up in begins shaping the language of each individual in the household. It becomes second nature and many people do not become aware of differences in speech until a later age. Speaking differently from other people can be a rough challenge and no one deserves to feel inferior because they are different. Some people may have difficulty saying certain words and those who speak well may degrade these people which should not be socially accepted. This is an easy essay to relate to when you can observe the way others interact with each other.

English 101 Mother Tongue Amy Tan makes a valid point about the use of different Englishes that are spoken in different places and to certain people. What one says may sometimes vary based on the person, situation, or event as well. How one speaks and what they pick up on happens in the home and other people see them differently based on the way they speak. Different languages become difficult to translate as well because there isn’t always a similar word in the translating language. Many people can relate to this story in the aspect that everyone has their own way of speaking and others’ make them feel inferior with their speech.

Some people may have difficulty saying certain words and those who speak well may downsize the verbally handicapped. This is a great essay that relates well to this day and time. Tan relates to her own experiences to compare how people think and to how society sees them. She believed her mother to be illiterate because she spoke improper or broken English and other people looked down on her for it. She was laughed at and often times not taken seriously because, being an immigrant with a strong Asian background, her English wasn’t as proper as others.

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Amy Tan grew up taking calls for her mother and impersonating her on the phone so her mother did not sound so illiterate while trying to communicate with superiors or people who owed her money. This strategy was soon found out however, when Mrs. Tan had to speak to these people in person. Amy believed, “her [mother’s] English reflected the quality of what she had to say. That is, because she expressed them imperfectly her thoughts were imperfect… People in department stores, at banks, and at restaurants did not take her seriously, did not give her good service, pretend not to understand her, or even acted as if they did not hear her. (142) Society has the need to be perfect and if someone speaks imperfectly, then they are often treated unfairly. Languages spoken in the home and often picked up at school threw peers. The house is the base for learning. Amy Tan came from an immigrant family where no one knew how to speak proper English. This in turn, made it hard to learn the correct way of speaking especially when learning. The first step of speaking the proper way is to recognize how everyone else speaks as well as the way they react to what is said to them.

Once someone recognizes that there is a difference in the way they speak, in comparison to the rest of society, and how they are treated, they become aware of how they can change their English. They must first start by paying attention to people around them; how they act and react to the way things are said to them. Different englishes vary based on environments’. When someone is at work, they have a particular way in which they talk to different people; consumers, superiors, and fellow co-workers.

While changing to a different situation; at home, one would probably not talk to their parents the same way that they would ague with a sibling. School seems to be the safe place to speak one’s mind, with their peers of course. Speaking to teachers would also differ from being with friends or speaking with strangers. Englishes vary based on group or environment because the people who are being spoken to need to be able to fully understand what is spoken. Amy and her mother experienced this as well. She states, “Some of my friends tell me they understand 50 percent of what my mother says.

Some say they understand 80 to 90 percent. Some say they understand none of it, as if she were speaking Chinese. But to me, my mother’s English is perfectly clear, perfectly natural. It’s my mother’s tongue. ” (141) Growing up with her mother, Amy became accustomed to the way her mother spoke, everyone interprets a languages differently based on their own perspective. Amy Tan believes that with growing up in an immigrant household and her mother being her role model, speaking broken English in the home negatively impacted her academically. I think my mother’s English almost had an effect on limiting my possibilities in life as well. I do think that the language spoken in the family plays a large role in shaping the language of the child” (143) Tan claims that her I. Q. and S. A. T scores where hindered by improper English in the household. What Amy states makes sense in the aspect that everyone learns to speak the language they where raised with. Peers influence your speech, but your home life defines it. When you hear a language all your life, it becomes the way you speak as well.

When one grows up with a language, they don’t think to question it. Need of improvement does not even become an idea until you connect that the way you speak reflects the way you speak to a point. The use of different Englishes is so natural that few people are aware of any change in our language, but it has become so natural for people to alter their speech in a way that is comfortable for everyone and so that it can be better understood. Our vocabulary and ideas change to better suit any given environment and differs for all groups of people as well; peers, family, superiors, and clients.

The environment one grows up in begins shaping the language of each individual in the household. It becomes second nature and many people do not become aware of differences in speech until a later age. Speaking differently from other people can be a rough challenge and no one deserves to feel inferior because they are different. Some people may have difficulty saying certain words and those who speak well may degrade these people which should not be socially accepted. This is an easy essay to relate to when you can observe the way others interact with each other.

Analysis of “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan: DRAFT Essay

Analysis of “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan: DRAFT

Mother Tongue is about the authors struggles with her linguistic identity, her mothers “fractured” or “broken” variation of english and the relationship with her mother. At the beginning of the piece we are told about the different types of english she would speak with her mother and with everyone else; we are then told how english wasn’t Amy’s strongest subject and later on we are told about the difficulties her mother experienced because of the way she spoke english and the prejudice she faced.

In the text Tan uses a variety of stylistic devices to express herself, tans use of parallel structures is used frequently throughout the piece, for example she starts the first paragraph with the phrase “i am not a scholar of english” and the second with “i am a writer”; this contrast implies to the audience that you don’t have to know everything about english to be a writer. She also uses personification in the second paragraph when she says ” language is the tool of my trade”. This might suggest that the use of language through writing is the way she expresses herself or gets her point across. She then goes onto saying ” And i use them all- all the Englishes i grew up with” and in the next paragraph she says “Recently, i was made keenly aware of the different Englishes i do use.”

She uses repetition in this instance to emphasize how, in her opinion, there is no right way or one way of speaking english there are different variations, in this instance the English with her mother is very different from how she speaks english to her teachers or classmates, this can refer back to the title of the text “mother tongue”. Mother tongue is usually reffered to the first language a person is taught, however i think Tans use of the word mother tongue is much more intimate in a sense that she feels that her english or her mother tongue is unique to her, and that the variation of english she speaks to her mother is her mother tongue. Moreover she also uses repition when she uses the words “broken”, “fractured” and “limited” as it is shown numerous times throughout the text, these words suggest what other people may view of her mothers english, however Tans use of an antithesis when she uses the phrase “impeccable broken english” really grasps the readers attention, as the concept of something being broken but yet impeccable is very strange.

This phrase may imply that although Tans mothers english might be “limited”, but in her opinion it does not strike her as being wrong as so many would think; she clearly states this when she says “Some say they understand none of it, as if she were speaking pure Chinese. But to me, my mothers English is perfectly clear, perfectly natural”. Moreover She uses personification again to emphasize the variation of English she speaks when she says “the intersection of memory upon imagination”. Towards the fifth paragraph Amy uses many anecdotes or personal experiences to give the audience a bit more of an insight with the troubles she faced when she was younger with her mother and the prejudice she faced. Furthermore Amys use of dialogue throughout the text lets the audience experience her mother tongue.

I think that the main purpose of this article is to show people that there is no right type of english, and that english comes in many forms therefore there should be no prejudice. She shows this by putting emphasis on the word “English” and “Englishes” throughout the text. Tan implies that many people have very narrow minded and misconceived views of people from a different culture or language background, she uses the example of her personal experience and mother to show this, for example people would take her mother seriously due to her “broken” english, as it suggests that her mother might be uneducated. However Tan also mentions how her mother “reads the Forbes repot, listens to Wall Street Week, converses daily with her stockbroker and reads all of Shirley MacLaine books with ease- all kind of things i can’t begin to understand”, most of the audience might be quite surprised with this, as it seems very unusual for a women from China and who has “watered-down” english to understand things of such complexity. This in itself proves Tans point of society’s misconception and generalisation of people with different language backgrounds.

In this text we notice that Tan uses very simple and easy to read english, however at the same time we are able to understand the complexity of her argument. The last paragraph emphasis how Tan is more concerned about her audience rather than the approval of critics and she doesn’t need to write like a professor to get her point across. Moreover throughout the text has a pattern of using a personal experience then expanding on it.

Unlike most of the other literature you’ve read for class, “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan is short and pretty easy to breeze through. But now you have to do a literary analysis on it–and suddenly its short length seems like more of a burden than a blessing.

Fortunately, there are several different literary devices you can concentrate on for your literary analysis. I am going to show you a few of these devices and give you some awesome tips on how to incorporate them into your analysis of “Mother Tongue.”

Symbolism in “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan

Image by Steve Johnson via flickr

Symbolism is when an author uses an object, person, or place to represent a deeper concept. Even though language is not an object you can hold, Amy Tan still uses language to symbolize different, more ambiguous concepts.

Tip #1: Think about Tan’s use of different Englishes and what they symbolize for her.

Tan talks about a few different types of English and in what situations she uses them, but each English form symbolizes something different to her.

What we would call “proper English” symbolizes both Tan’s acceptance into American society and a separation from her mother. Tan highlights this dichotomy when she writes about giving her speech, saying the “proper English” words that she was using felt strange to say when her mother was in the room.

Tan says she uses “simple English” around her mother, and while this isn’t the same form that her mother speaks, it symbolizes the bond between her and her family. She says even her husband started speaking this kind of English together and that it has come to represent intimacy.

Tip #2: Write about Tan’s mother’s use of English and what it symbolizes.

Tan is very attached to her mother’s English to the point that she doesn’t want to refer to it as “broken.” To her it symbolizes home because it’s the English she grew up with. She says it provides imagery and emotions that standard, grammatically-correct English cannot.

However, Tan’s mother’s English also symbolizes the limitations of immigrants in America and the challenges they have to face to be accepted. She alludes to several instances where people, even a doctor, would not take her mother seriously because of the way she spoke.

Structure in “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan

Every piece of literature, whether it’s an epic novel or a haiku, has some sort of structure–which is simply the organization of the material.

Tip #3: Even though “Mother Tongue” is a short story, analyze its plot or progression.

I hesitate to use the word “plot” in the case of “Mother Tongue” because it doesn’t seem to have much of one, at least not in the traditional sense that most fiction stories do. But it does have a loose progression.

Tan talks about growing up with different forms of English and how that affected both her childhood and adult life. She talks about the challenges her mother faced with her “limited” English. Finally, she wraps it up nicely with a note about how she now uses those various forms of English in her career.

Tip #4: Write about the changing views of Tan on language.

Tan mentions several different emotions when talking about her mother’s English. She goes from being ashamed of her mother’s speaking–feeling that other people will judge her family–to being proud of the rich culture behind her mother’s English.

Tip #5: Think about the essay’s structure and how effective it is for the story itself.

Spend some time evaluating the essay’s structure, and analyze whether it is right for “Mother Tongue.” Would it have been better as a novel or a poem, or is a short narrative the way to go? Does the story feel complete as is? Does it drag on too much? All of these questions will help you pinpoint the essay’s effectiveness.

Tip #6: Explain how Tan’s love of language shows throughout the story.

Near the beginning of “Mother Tongue,” Tan says, “I am fascinated by language in daily life. I spend a great deal of my time thinking about the power of language–the way it can evoke an emotion, a visual image, a complex idea, or a simple truth.”

Remember this quote as you read through and relate the rest of the content to this idea.

Tone in “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan

In literature, tone is the feeling an author conveys to the audience. There can be one tone throughout the entire piece or many different tones. Tan does a great job incorporating several different tones into such a short piece. Now all you have to do is analyze them.

Tip #7: Hone in on the different tones throughout the story, and write about them.

From guilty to gracious, annoyed to appreciative, Amy Tan uses a few different tones throughout “Mother Tongue.” Identify these tones and explain how they are employed (the language used to convey the tones), and what effect it has on the reader.

Tip #8: Analyze the tonal shifts.

Because there are quite a few different tones in this short story, they transition from one to the other. A good literary analysis might explain these transitions, and how they affect the structure of the piece. How do each of these shifts in tone help move the reader along in the story?

Tip #9: Think about the overall tone of “Mother Tongue” and how that tone is created.

Just because there are several tones throughout “Mother Tongue” doesn’t mean that there isn’t one overarching tone. In fact, Tan uses the same tone in the beginning and end of her story–the reader starts at a homebase, sees the journey Tan is leading them on, and returns right back to where they started but with more insight than before.

This progression is typical of many stories, both long and short, but in this case you can apply it to tone as well. Be sure to focus on specific language, punctuation, and imagery used to create the overall tone.

Tip #10: Tan says that she has always been rebellious. Write about how this shows in the tone of her writing.

When writing about becoming an English major in college, Tan said that she had always been rebellious. How does she use language in the rest of her story to portray this rebelliousness?

(Hint: Think about how she defies modern language standards and refuses to call her mother’s language “broken” or “limited” without putting those terms in quotation marks.)

Final Thoughts on “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan

Image by Gideon Tsang via Wikimedia Commons

Though “Mother Tongue” is a very short narrative, it’s rich in content. Symbolism, structure, and tone are only a few literary devices you can use for your analysis, but they are the ones that’ll help you get the most out of your analysis.

It’s not about how long a story is, but rather about its content.

MLA Citation for “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan

Tan, Amy. “Mother Tongue.” The McGraw Hill Reader: Issues Across the Disciplines. 10th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2008. 62-67. Print.

Hopefully this list leaves you feeling like you’re no longer short on ideas for your analysis of this short story. After you’ve written your literary analysis, and you don’t feel very confident in it, pass it along to one of the Kibin editors. They’ll help you make Amy Tan proud by assisting with proper language and other editing.

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